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Traditions & Changes

Morses Line, looking North, from Vermont into Quebec

Our first honey house was in the international village of Morses Line, Vermont & Quebec. On the right of the road is the old Richard Brothers Apiary that we moved into. The second building on the right is the Bucket-of-Blood bar, with the Vermont-Quebec border in the middle of the bar. In the Prohibition, the customers would move north to Canadian side for liquor the name of the bar and remnants of glass in the back yard attested to some of action in this building. The buildings on the left are all in Quebec. The forage for the bees was abundant, and they were independent of any boundary or business there.

If you draw a line from the United States north into Canada, the further north you go, the more honey the bees generally make each season. Our first honey house was as far north as one could go in the United States, in Morses Line, Vermont, north of the US Customs office and hugging the Quebec border. The flowers from the dairy farming community on both sides of the international line supported our bees as they gathered nectar, pollen, and propolis.The two Richard Brothers had kept bees here for years, and we continued that tradition, working with a peak of around 180 colonies of bees in Franklin Country, Vermont.

This is a bi-lingual community the language would gracefully move in out of French and English throughout the day. There is an innocence that is so pure here I remember going to a baseball game in Montreal with one of the neighbor children, and he remarked that the buildings were taller than his silos. The farms here are a sacred space, and are passed down from generation to generation in families that carry their traditions forward in time. We began here with a two seater outhouse, a mortgage of $130/month and a huge, sacred poplar tree in the front yard that gave propolis to the bees (seen as a smaller tree in this picture, on the right of the road.)

Our bees are all wrapped for the winter now. They are stronger than they were 12 months ago, with many more bees of the Russian, mite-resistant stock than we have ever seen. For years we have wrapped them, and when the last yard is completed, there is a peace that settles over the honey house. The hard working bees are insulated from the cold winds, snow and rain. With more than 30 bee yard locations, the wrapping takes weeks and is a rhythm of fall moving into winter that invariably ends with time outside in the snow in a polar environment. This year we started to bring four bee hives tight together, and wrap them in a cluster so that they may share their heat and move through the winter as stronger families. These changes convey and air of hope and promise to the bees.

We are continuing to work with our bees with organic policies. It is expected that at least 30% of the colonies may pass on this winter, and from the stronger survivors we will raise more queens, with the genetics of the Russian bees providing mite resistance. We will not use any chemical medicines to artificially allow the weaker colonies to live. Our organic procedures will protect our Apitherapy raw honey and our traditional plant medicines made with this honey. We feel that every action that we move through regarding the bees is transmitted into the integrity, medicinal and food value of our honey and plant medicines.

There is a new snow today covering the honey house and the fields around here. The snow is welcome as it will insulate the nectar plants, bring water and nitrogen to these plants, and remind us to get our cross country skiis and skates out of storage. As we wind down this season and anticipate the holidays, we reflect on the years of the rhythms of traditions of working with the bees. So much is old, and also so much is new as we learn more about how to have a relationship with the bees that are facing so many environmental challenges. .

About 40% of what you eat depends on pollination by insects, much of this by honey bees. With the decline in bees, gardeners and farmers have been noticing less crops honey bees are the “canaries in the coal mine”, and they have helped us be more aware of changes in our environment. We are grateful to be sharing the traditions of beekeeping and plant medicines with all of you and send you our best and the end of the agricultural season and beginning of new seasons.

about Caledonia Spirits

The adventure continues
a note from the honey house & Todd

I began a relationship with honey bees when my brother Tom and I got our first bee hive and placed it on the top field of our family farm. He was 9, I was 12. We were enchanted by these angelic insects that were always flying and gathering nectar, pollen, and propolis.

About 40% of the food we eat depends on insects for pollination, and to a great degree, these are honey bees. Everything that honey bees do for us is a benefit to our communities. Even their sting is beneficial to most people. If you are not allergic to bees, getting sting by a honey bee can be a very healthy thing. Charlie Mraz always said and wrote that beekeepers do not get cancer. Drawn from the traditions of Eastern Europe where bee venom is respected for its healthful properties that support the immune system, many have come over the years and asked to have bees put on them for this venom.

After some seasons with the bees, I knew that I wanted to be a beekeeper in Vermont. I loved the land and the ongoing rhythms of the seasons, and working with the bees keeps one very close to the earth, the flowers, and the cycles of the seasons and life. Vermont is a community where agriculture is honored and respected.

As one goes north, from Florida to Saskatchewan, the yields of honey increase with each latitude. In Vermont there are five months of cool weather where the bees can gather nectar from the flowers. An average plant is 84% water, and in the south the heat shuts down the water and thus the nectar from flowing through the plants. The heat in the south is much more of a challenge than the cold weather of the north.

Our first honey house was in Morses Line, Franklin, Vermont, with the land touching the Quebec border. We were between the U.S. and the Canadian customs offices, on some land that once had a bar that straddled the international line. The bar was called the “Bucket of blood” because of the fights there in the 1800′s. In the U.S. prohibition, customers would go from the Vermont side to the Quebec end of the business for their beverages. Years later, there still was a pile of broken bottles in the back yard. On one side of the land, the kids would speak French, and on the other English. Two bachelor brothers had lived there for years, and were beekeepers. They left us a barn of equipment to use with our bees.

We took the neighbor youth the Expos baseball games in Montreal, and they said the building were taller than their silos.

In past days, a family in Vermont would have bees, chickens, and elderberries, now many people have dogs, cats and goldfish. That is fine, and I am happy that the bees, the chickens, and the elderberries are returning. It is very exciting.

This mortgage for this first honey house was $1,000 down and $133 a month. There was a two seater outhouse in the rear barn. It was exciting to get plumbing and heat in the house. Next to the house was a huge, sacred poplar tree that the bees gathered propolis from. Our work was very idealistic; the honey went into pint and quart canning jars that were re-usable. A clamshell label was held in place with a rubber band, thus more information could be put on into this label and one did not have to use water and work to get the label off of the jar. With every purchase came a free rubber band. Our label had 8 cycles of the moon on the front of it, Moon Shine Apiaries.

We ran about 180 colonies. While in the seventies, beekeeping was a lot easier than it is now, with most of the colonies getting through the winter then, it has never been easy to be involved in such a labor intensive business and cover all of the costs. We never had a way to heat the honey; I just could not bear to hurt the honey. In the first few hours of extracting and bottling honey, I plucked all of the darker pieces of wax and propolis out of each jar with a chopstick, and then realized that was nuts and we could not do that and continue. We brought this raw honey to market, that was never heated or filtered. People would say that our honey was dirty as it had dark specks on top of the jars. We had to get involved in a ongoing education effort to explain to each person that complained or commented that theses were small particles of beeswax, propolis, and pollen, the “good stuff” that allows for raw honey to be a medicine, a food, as well as a sweetener.

Most all of the honey in the marketplace was heated and would thus stay liquid for months into the winter and spring. Most truly raw northern honey will get hard by the end of October. There were a few co-ops and health food stores in Northern Vermont that would take the honey and in time, asked for this new way (to them) of handling honey, which actually involved taking the time to do nothing to it at all. This was nothing we started, it was just helping to bring back something that had been done 100 years ago. I began to make monthly trips to Boston to serve the stores there, and always stayed with my grandparents. They were a huge encouragement over the years, and for that I am grateful.

In Scotland, we were farmers. One branch of the family distilled, and today, one can still buy the Antiquary scotch from Edinburgh. It began with J & W Hardie. My great great great grandfather John Hardie sailed from Scotland to New York City in 1817. It was a rough voyage, and his diary gives thanks for sparing his life on this sailing ship. “There was no work for a young man” in New York then, he wrote and within weeks he was headed to Alabama to farm. His son John farmed cotton in Arkansas and had a seat on the cotton exchange of New Orleans. He said that “the best best fertilizer was the footprint of the farmer” and that has been a guiding force in my life – take the time, fertilize the ground and relationships, keep going, do your best though all the crop abundances and seasons of crop failure. We have always been in the growing and marketing of the crops. Our friends in Quebec call it “transformation”, to give value to a crop and bring it in a value added form to market.

As a young commercial beekeeper, I tried many a path to make the business work. We took most of the colonies of bees to the Pee Dee River region around Mullins, South Carolina for four winters. There the bees can be “split” in the Spring to make up for the loses that they are experiencing world wide. Spring starts two months earlier in South Carolina then Northern Vermont, and they have flowers to provide nectar and pollen throughout the winter. Spring moves up the Atlantic coats at the speed of 15 miles a day. One Spring we brought the bees from South Carolina to Cherryfield, Maine to pollinate wild blueberries. Moving bees is a Herculean amount of work and expense. I recall the day I was given three checks for $37,000 for pollinating blueberries on a 10,000 acre field in Maine. I was delighted, as I thought I had found a way to make beekeeping work. Later I realized that after all the labor, hiring a tractor trailer, diesel for our own truck, an axel break down in Virginia on the trailer, months of work and the bees not making any honey that summer in Vermont and New York because they were so weak coming off of a month on the blueberries, that we lost money. It was exhausting, but worth trying.

One night I was loading our red Dodge one ton truck at midnight. Especially when it gets warm in the days of Spring in the South, one has to load and move bees when it is dark and cool. I had a vision to look into making cough syrup with raw honey and vinegar. The “folk doctor” from Vermont, Dr. Jarvis, has long taught and written about the value of using raw honey and apple cider vinegar to make a healthy drink.

These were the years of 1,000 miles on the roads each week. After the bees were loaded, I drove eight hours to my parents’ farm in Maryland, slept and hour and then started driving north before it got too sunny and hot, which would have been hard on the bees. When I arrived in New York, I unloaded the colonies and worked with them. These long days gave rise to inspiration on how to diversity, give value to raw honey, and use it in traditional plant medicine.

After Cornell Ag. school, I had moved to Hardwick, Caledonia Country. Caledonia translates to Scotland. After a year there, I realized that I had to be in the Champlain Valley of Vermont and the St. Lawrence River Valley of Northern New York State in order to be a commercial beekeeper, with at least 1,000 colonies of bees. These river and lake valleys are where the bees have traditionally done well. While living in Hardwick, I was the bee inspector for the Vermont Department of Agriculture in Northern Vermont. I inspected the bees of Lewis Hill, and we became friends. Lewis is a gentle giant of Vermont horticulture and with his wife Nancy wrote many books over the years about horticulture, berries, and living in the Northeast Kingdom, the three counties in the north east corner of Vermont.

For 14 years, Lewis told me about the elderberry, a berry bush that he grew in his nursery. He had cultivated varieties that were more hardy for overwintering in the north and that had larger berries. Elderberry has anti-viral agents that get rid of the virus in the common cold.

I was so occupied with the honey bees and building up the operation and the markets for raw honey, that I politely listened to Lewis when he suggested that I look into the elderberry, that I did not hear him for 14 years. In this time, we built the operation up to 1,900 colonies, but the winter loses continued to escalate and be severe most seasons. Then I started to see elderberry syrup in health food stores that was made with white sugar and/or fructose from Europe. I realized that we could make a higher quality product with raw honey and local, organic elderberries right at home in Vermont. I went back to Lewis and told him that I wanted to learn more about the elderberry from him. He was happy that I was finally opening to learning about the elderberry, took me into his office and pulled out research articles and books for an hour.

Tim McFarline and I developed our elderberry syrup formula at the Vermont Venture Center, with the help of the Cornell pilot plant in Geneva, New York. Agriculture is so challenging and humbling, I learned how to ask for help, and we were blessed over the years by herbalists and scientists in Vermont-New York-Quebec-New Hampshire who we collaborated with.

As a second product after the wild cherry cough syrup with raw honey, the elderberry syrup allowed us to continue to diversity away from relying so much on selling just honey from our bees.

Honey Gardens Apiaries was blessed to continue extending its line of traditional plant medicine one season where the bears were getting more of honey than we were sending to market. Hardly an hour went by when I did not have to deal with putting bee hives back together after the bears came into a bee yard. They are looking for the protein in the young brood. While I learned that the bears can communicate across four counties within a day if there is a message about an crop of berries or where the bees are, it was not much comfort as our losses were so great. If there was a tree next to an electric fence, they would climb the tree and then vault into the bee yard, across the electric fence. They are smart.

Then, one day, I was putting eight hives back together that the bears had pushed over in domino effect. Boxes of bees and honey were everywhere. This was a campaign were were not winning. A very clear message came to me that we were spread out too far as commercial beekeepers, should work closer to home, and develop a honey product with purple loosestrife. This beautiful purple plant was spreading throughout many of the towns we worked in Vermont and more so in St. Lawrence and Jefferson Country, New York State. This particular yard was surrounded by thousands of acres of purpose loosestrife. I soon learned that the plant has strong antibiotic, antiviral, and fungicidal qualities. We began to harvest it and mix it with raw honey, Usnea (lichen that grows from living a dead trees), and propolis to make a throat spray and wound wash.

Five years ago we began to make mead, wine from honey. It is a wine that is older than grape wine, from the days of King Arthur’s court. It is appropriate to the north where honey bees are a more of tradition in our communities than grapes. It takes about a year to make good honey wine, and it is easy on the body when one drinks it, which is important for me. In the old days, the term honeymoon came when a couple was married and drank wine for a month to get pregnant and start a family. The wine nurtures amorous thoughts.

We continued our diversification with the bees and honey when we started Caledonia Spirits. Our mission was to employ people and to support agriculture in the region. Now we are buying honey, corn, elderberries, juniper berries from farmers. Three years ago, we built a winery and distillery on the banks of the Lamoille River in Hardwick. It is a very beautiful place, just south of the river, Hardwick Lake and the town forest. You can hear the loons on the lake at night. We have planted elderberries all around the building, and there are two bee hives there.

The adventure continues. Andrew Pinault is working with Ryan Christiansen to distill spirits. I am the assistant to the assistant and enjoy the marketing, graphics, and bees and working with all of the characters and personalities of the team that make this work. We all have gifts that compliment each other. Ryan started a successful home-brew shop and loves fermentation, yeast and the quest for quality. Now he is our Head Distiller and makes Barr Hill Gin and Barr Hill Vodka and Elderberry Cordial. Whiskey is aging in the barrel and our brand new whiskey still is being carefully installed, after we retrieved it at the Portland, ME harbor in early January 2013. Our gin and vodka stills were custom designed and built, using recycled stainless steel and parts from the US instead of buying stills from Europe. On Friday, the smell of honey vodka was in the air. The stills do work. They bring me glasses of spirits to taste, and I am learning. Our gin has a strong tone of juniper berries. The vodka can be creamy, really lovely.

It is good to be back in Hardwick. It is a collaborative community where people help each other. Many of us get together the first Tuesday of the month for dinner and discussion. The host picks a topic that she or he needs help on. When I need a tractor to push snow around, I borrow it from Vermont Soy. We help them develop a plan to do demos in Eastern Massachusetts, get raw milk from their North Hardwick Dairy and are looking forward to learning more about them about how to grow sunflowers for oil for people and to power diesel tractors and vehicles. High Mowing Seeds did trials for us this past summer with 22 varieties of sugar beets as we seek another source of carbohydrates for our beverages that is sustainable and will give the local farmers another option for a crop. After cheese and spirits buyers from NYC leave the Cellars at Jasper Hill, they come to Caledonia. I help the new beekeeper at the Jasper Hill take care of her bees. We love their cheese.

We would be honored for you to visit. In the town north of Hardwick, Barr Hill is in the center of the town of Greensboro. This beautiful hill has been conserved by the Nature Conservancy, and is a great place to hike or cross country ski. The view on our spirits labels is of forests and farms, Caspian Lake and mountains to the South. From the top, you can see the White Mountains, Camel’s Hump, Montreal, Lewis Hills’s nursery, his great nephew Shaun’s brewery, and over to his brother Jasper’s farm. Pete’s Greens is close, the next town north, Craftsbury. We are inspired by the high places.

Caledonia Elderberry Cordial, Barr Hill gin, and our Barr Hill vodka are now available at the distillery, some farmers markets, and the State stores of Vermont in a few weeks. Then we will work in Massachusetts, where Renee has cultivated great relationships with our honey wine. NYC will follow; we are looking for the right distributor relationship. Please let me know if you have any input on distribution in The City, contacts in liquor stores, bars and/or restaurants.

It is all relationship, and New York City and Boston make Vermont agriculture possible.

I am inspired to be in New York City today, where my great great grandfather landed in 1817, and spend the time with our daughter and her friends who just moved to Brooklyn. They are part of the farmers markets, working on fair trade, organic agriculture policy and the growing healthy food system.

Thank you for your support of our work with honey bees and those that work in agriculture.

October 16, 2011

todd@caledoniaspirits.com

a film by Jan Cannon

Health & the Hive: A Beekeeper’s Journey explores the importance of honeybees in our lives. Topics addressed in the film include pollination, queen breeding, disease control, bee venom therapy, organic agriculture and honey-based plant medicine.


April Newsletter 2014

the soul of a farmer

field notes from an 8,000+ mile, 4.6 week trip around our country

“Here we are smelling the nectar off of the ti-ti flower. We are fixing to raise queens, and are about two weeks late because of the weather, rain and cold. The bees are getting ready for tupelo which will be around the 15th or 18th of April.” – Steve Cantu, Wewahitchka, in the Florida Panhandle
March 20, 2014
Steve, his wife Leslie and family have moved their honey bees for years from Central Florida north into the Panhandle. The excessive use of chemicals in Central Florida was keeping their queen bees from successfully mating, and was killing the bees that were out for pollination and honey production. The Northwest of Florida, the Panhandle region, is heavily forested, and the bees gather nectar from the flowers here, including the famous tupelo tree that grows in the swamp areas. As it is not an agricultural area like Central Florida, it does not have an extensive use of chemicals.

Steve is a long friend. For years we bought orange blossom honey from his family business. The Cantu family moves its bees between the pollination of vegetables and honey gathering of Florida and Michigan. He and Leslie are people of great faith and courage. Finding locations to put your bees and moving them throughout the season is a lot of work.

The United States is a country addicted to drugs. The overuse of chemicals in pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, bactericides, miticides, and GMO’s is appalling. Not only is it killing the honey bees, but it is ruining the health of our people. The chemicals and GMO’s offer a short term gain but, as with any drug, the gain is fleeting, and there is always a price to pay. There is no cutting corners for food production without a cost. We are seeing this now in the deaths of bees, the rise of allergies and gluten intolerance many people now have, and the loss of soil.

The endless miles of GMO corn in Indiana and Illinois were staggering. Maybe it was because it was so many thousands of acres upon acres all at once. In Vermont, we are not perfect; we use chemicals and GMO corn, but there are many organic farms, and it is all on a smaller scale.

true friends

Jim Huggins on his farm
Jim Huggins, Cartwheel Landing, by the Pee Dee River, Marion Country, Mullins, South Carolina
In this day and age, it is rare for a commercial beekeeper to not move colonies of honey bees south for the winter and migrate to a warmer climate. As bees pollinate much of our food, they have to be moved around during the season. For four winters, we moved most of our colonies of honey bees to the Pee Dee River Valley of South Carolina. The bees rested for the winter and were increased in the spring on the land of Jim and Ann Huggins and their family and friends.

Last week I paid my respects to the Huggins family. As always, the visit was centered around family dropping by, meals with pork and cornbread, and a drive around the 1,000 acres of hogs, cattle and timber. For 50 years, the Huggins have been giving shelter and food to northern beekeepers. When you spend much of the winter and spring 900 miles from home, it is a blessing to belong to a community of such generous and kind people and know that you can always walk in for a hot meal, no matter how tired or dirty you are.

By mid-April, the beehives are loaded onto tractor trailers and brought north for their summer pasture. One spring, after the tractor trailer of bees was fully loaded and netted down for the trip north (the bees are loaded when it gets dark and then travel under the cool of the night), the 80,000 lb. load got stuck in the sand of the pine forest and would not budge and move to the road. I called the Huggins family and asked for help. In the middle of the night, they appeared 45 minutes later on their big old tractor, the one with dual rear wheels. They hitched onto the front of the tractor trailer and pulled it, the 200 horsepower diesel engine screaming for an hour, inch by inch to the road. They would not let me cover the cost of even their diesel fuel. The bees were on their way, north to the cooler states before the sun came up. These are true friends, the ones you are forever grateful for.

diesel & hot dogs

Driving north from the Huggins’ last week, I was reminded that I knew every crack in the highway home. Years ago, when I made the trips with the bees or bee equipment, I would often set out for the 900 mile trip either way with $8 cash and a Texaco credit card. That was all that I had, and thankfully it worked. I did not use the toll roads. Honey bees were not allowed on the New Jersey Turnpike. With the credit card, I could buy diesel and hot dogs, cashews and coffee along the way. JR’s on I-95 in North Carolina had a box of cigars marked “free”. They were all broken but they were good for the all night driving with the bees.
Returning home a few days ago from my 8,000+ mile journey across our country, I was very grateful that the trip was much easier. I was not carrying bees; with them aboard, you cannot stop or they will fly away. No stopping at JR’s, but at the homes of a string of friends along the way.
This is a big country, filled with really good people. I saw the growth of local food & spirits being supplied to markets across the land. We need this to take care of our families, our land and farms, and our health.

thank you for your interest in and support of those who work in agriculture and organic honey, grains, and elderberry,

                                               Todd D. Hardie
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March Newsletter 2014

Barr Hill Reserve Tom Cat

Barr Hill Reserve Tom Cat barrel aged gin -  now in Vermont at Caledonia, Hardwick

and the Burlington and Montpelier farmer’s markets (see dates on web site). Soon after March 15, Tom Cat comes to Vermont state stores and to Astor Wines & Spirits, NYC (courageous cat).

Barr Hill Reserve Tom Cat barrel aged gin is our newest craft spirit at Caledonia Spirits. Tom Cat is simply our Barr Hill gin that we age in new American oak barrels for a few months. The oak barrels impart a woody, whiskey like flavor, which dances with the botanical components of organic juniper and raw northern honey present in our Barr Hill gin. The resulting spirit is soft, eloquent, and pure.We chose to name this spirit Tom Cat because we view it as the modern day adaptation of 18th Century England’s most revered spirit, Old Tom. After it was outlawed by the Spirits Act of 1750, rebellious pub owners would hang a wooden plaque shaped like a black cat to inform the passersby of their defiance of the ban. Deposit a few pennies through the cat’s mouth, and a bartender would pour a ration of Old Tom to be sipped through a tube between the cat’s paws.

“Caledonia County Fare”: dairy meets distillery in Caledonia County, Vermont from the story in the Burlington Free Press, with credit to Sally Pollack

What do you get when a beekeeper, dairy farmer, bartender, and distiller share a meal? “Caledonia County Fare” cocktail, of course!Johanna and John Laggis, farmers and our friends in Hardwick, make the delicious kefir that Todd Hardie brings to the Caledonia Spirits team. Kefir is a cultured milk drink with loads of probiotics and microorganisms that offer medicinal support to the digestive tract. In Todd’s words, “It’s pure medicine.” At the farm with about 500 milking cows, Johanna Laggis makes two gallons of kefir a day. She feeds some to her calves and some to friends.

The inspiration for the “Caledonia County Fare” cocktail came at a dinner where the Caledonia Spirits team shared an evening meal with their local friends in agriculture and business. Sip and enjoy; this cocktail is best savored after a meal because it offers digestive support.

Caledonia County Fare
2 oz Barr Hill gin
2 oz kefir (we use Butterworks Farm in Westfield, Vermont)
½ oz raw honey simple syrup*
splash of Caledonia Spirits elderberry cordial
seltzer water

Directions: Combine Barr Hill gin, kefir and honey simple syrup in a shaker with ice. Shake well. Pour over ice into a Collins glass. Top with seltzer and a splash of Caledonia Spirits elderberry cordial.

*To make honey simple syrup, combine one part raw honey with one part water. Heat gently until honey melts. Cool before adding.

Joanna Laggis in her calf barn
Johanna Laggis in her calf barn, Hardwick, Vermont

Live from the Hive: Spring is on the way

As March begins, the cold continues unabated.  Let’s feast our eyes on something other than more snow and ice. This photo shows a worker honey bee on a sumac flower. Sumac blooms in June and is a major food source for Vermont’s honey bees. This picture is a reminder of the coming of spring. The amber blob on the bee’s back leg is pollen.

The beekeeper checks on the hives in March and feeds the colony honey or some form of sugar if necessary — this is the month when colonies can starve. Believe it or not, if the temperatures warm up, we will begin to see the bees venturing out for the first pussy willow and alder pollen of  later this month, at least in southern Vermont. The spring equinox arrives on March 20th, when the day and night are of equal length. Happy Spring!

honey bee on a sumac flower
honey bee on a sumac flower, June 2013

field report from Todd:

I am on a four week journey West to share Caledonia Spirits, and am amazed by:

  • the rest of our country does not have three feet of snow.
  • the miles of GMO corn in Illinois and Indiana are staggering.
  • the support across our country for the agriculture, spirits, wine, cheese, seeds, vegetables, soy, and maple products, from those who love Vermont and are now away; we are very grateful.

Caledonia Spirits will release its first whiskey in May. Early Riser corn whiskey is named for the corn that Jack Lazor of Butterworks Farm supplies to Caledonia. It has been aging in new American oak barrels and the first barrel is ready to bottle.

200 bottles of the first barrel will shared as part of a benefit in May to help Jack pay for his medical expenses.

thank you for your interest in and support of our work with organic honey, grains, and elderberry.

                                               Todd D. Hardie

February 2014 newsletter

Andrew filling the barrelAndrew Pinault, Caledonia Spirits Distiller, filling a barrel of Barr Hill Reserve Tom Cat

“Each batch is aged in new American oak barrels for 3-4 months.  While resting in the barrels, the gin is constantly transforming.  The charred oak barrels contribute to the brown color of the spirit and give our Barr Hill Reserve Tom Cat its complex flavor.  This is our first brown spirit at Caledonia.  Weeks of discussion with the TTB lead to us not being able to use the word “gin” on the label (as raw honey is added after distillation and then it goes into a barrel), we are calling this Barr Hill Reserve “Tom Cat.”  We hope to release Tom Cat in February.” – Andrew Pinault

December 2013 newsletter

using organic grain to make whiskey

Jack Lazor loading 1,000 lb. of grain onto our truck at his grain mill, Westfield, VTButterworks Farm
Jack Lazor loading 1,000 lb. of organic corn onto our truck at his grain mill, Westfield, Vermont.

It is an honor to be using Jack’s organic corn to make whiskey and vodka.The quality of this corn is so wonderful that after 18 days in a new American oak barrel, the whiskey was so good that I wanted to bottle it then. Ryan is in charge of this, and said I had to wait: we will have our first release in 2014.

Maybe I am reacting to our family in Edinburgh; for most of the last 125+ years, they waited for 12 years to release their whisky at J.W. Hardie. Now in Vermont, we do not have the time, money or patience to wait 12 years, and I am grateful that our whiskey is so good as a youngster.

When I finished with ag school and started working with the elders of beekeeping in the Finger Lakes and then Vermont, if you had told me that how you treat your family, bees, and employees goes into every jar of honey, I would have thought you were kooky. But this was what was revealed after many seasons with our colonies of bees, and now we are seeing it with organic grain.

A few months ago, Ryan and I went to talk with Jack about his grains. First there was a long walk to the rear field to move the fence for the Butterworks Farm herd of cows. This is Vermont’s original organic yogurt dairy, making wonderful products for over 30 years. With rotational grazing, the cows get new grass every 12 hours. This keeps the grass and legumes young and nutritious and spreads out the manure.

We moved long lines of fences around in the dusk, and as darkness settled over these fields, it was clear that Jack knew his land well and could navigate by a little starlight. At this time in my life, I am treasuring the relationships where more is said by speaking less. I like walking next to Zorro the horse, accompanying him to and from the field and the barn, without a lead line with and just with a few words. With Jack, it was clear that this land had been cared for, loved and respected by the 38 years that he and his family had been stewards here.

The history of distilling has its roots in agriculture. This has been one way to get a return in your crop, preserve a crop and transport it more economically. We are now seeing how the growth of farm based distilling in Vermont, New York and Quebec is giving support to family farms, organic agriculture and healthy soils, and rural communities and businesses.The courage, creativity, and collaboration in Vermont now is not new; it goes back over 300 years.

joyous holidays to you,

thank you for your interest in and support of our work with organic honey, elderberries, and grain,

Todd

Todd D. Hardie

Ryan Christiansen, head distiller

ryan

What is your heritage, and where did you grow up?
My great-grandfather came from Denmark in the early 1900′s in search of farm land. He settled in East Montpelier. I grew up in Plainfield, a great little town with a strong, vibrant community, which resembles Hardwick in its agriculturally driven population. This summer we began building a house in Plainfield, which should be finished this winter. I’m excited to be back to my roots.

How did you come to distilling?
I’ve been studying fermentation for about 10 years. I opened a home brew store (Local Potion) 5 years ago. Small scale brewing at home was really fun, but after a few years, I realized that I craved a production environment. I always thought that I would be a brewer, but after hearing Todd’s vision for Caledonia Spirits, I knew that this was where I needed to be. After many experiments wih beer and winemaking, I was ready for a new set of variables, which distillation has provided. It’s a new wave of fascination to add to my love for fermentation.

What’s your favorite winter activity?
Snowshoeing and brewing beer, because in winter time the cold weather helps to cool the beer. My winter hobbies are driven by the temperatures.